Unboxing the Nikon D750 DSLR Camera

I’m excited! Yesterday I bought a brand new Nikon D750 DSLR camera along with a 50mm f/1.8G Nikkor prime lens. It was the result of a lot of research on my part but I feel like I made a really good choice. But enough about that — I want to try it out! This post will let you share in unboxing my Nikon D750 DSLR camera.

The Copper Box

The box itself has a fairly minimalist aesthetic to it. It’s sort of a goldish / copper color all over, with a big D750 prominently displayed on all four sides as well as the top. Other than the yellow Nikon logo, you would never know that there was a $2,000+ camera inside! The cardboard is very thick, sturdy, and glossy. It’s definitely a premium material. There was no shrink wrap, tape, or label to actually seal the box from being opened.

Nikon D750 DLSR Camera Box

Nikon D750 DLSR Camera Box

Some Light Reading

Not being able to resist the temptation any longer, I opened the box. The first thing to greet me was a thick bundle of manuals, warranty papers, and CDs. All of these were packaged together in thin plastic.

Nikon D750 manuals inside

Nikon D750 manuals inside

Inside I found there to be manuals in both English and French, a warranty paper, a small paper booklet containing errata to the manual, and a CD containing Nikon’s View NX 2 software.The manual is hefty! A solid 506 pages a bedtime reading awaits me tonight! It looks like there’s a lot of content as well. It’s not just tables of reference data and appendices.

The manual is hefty! A solid 506 pages a bedtime reading awaits me tonight! It looks like there’s a lot of content as well. It’s not just tables of reference data and appendices.

Nikon D750 manuals & paperwork

Nikon D750 manuals & paperwork

I’m not really sure why companies still ship CDs with their products anymore. I for one don’t even have a CD drive in any of my computers anymore, and even when I did, the software is usually out of date by the time it’s installed anyway. Much better would be to just provide a link to download the latest version.

Digging Deeper

Underneath the manuals, there’s another single layer with all the electronics. There she is! Wrapped in bubble wrap on the left-hand side is the Nikon D750 camera itself. On the right-hand side is a single compartment with all of the other components. Each component looks to be individually wrapped in plastic. Other than a simple cardboard divider down the middle, there are no other means of separation inside. Pretty minimalistic inside too!

Nikon D750 & electronics in the box

Nikon D750 & electronics in the box

I pulled everything out of the box, unwrapped the plastic, and laid them on the table to take inventory. Inside was the Nikon D750 camera itself (obviously), battery, battery charger, wall plug adapter for the battery charger, neck strap, USB cable, and viewfinder cover.

Nikon D750: Everything included in the box

Nikon D750: Everything included in the box

The camera itself is beautiful! It feels very solid in my hands and I love the finish of it. The D750 body is a combination of magnesium and carbon composite materials that feel like they could really take a beating (not that I’m going to try!). The hand grip, as well as a small strip on the opposite side of the camera, have a textured rubberized coating which makes it really easy to hold.

Nikon D750 DSLR Camera

Nikon D750 DSLR Camera

I’ve got fairly small hands and the camera seems to fit me perfectly! Weight-wise it’s definitely got some heft, but not excessive and I don’t think I’ll have any problem using this camera for an extended period of time.

The neck strap seems to be very high quality as well. On one side it’s embroidered in yellow with the make and model of the camera “Nikon D750”, and the other side (the side that would be in contact with your neck) is a sort of rubber material to reduce slippage. I’m not sure how well that’s going to work with sweat, though — we’ll see.

The USB cable for connecting the camera to another device was included as well. The cable has a standard USB-A connector at one end, and a proprietary connector on the other.

Nikon D750 USB Cable

Nikon D750 USB Cable

I couldn’t actually figure out what the last little piece supplied with the camera was at first. It was a flat little rectangular piece of plastic with no indication on it as to what it was. After scouring the manual for a bit I found that it’s actually a cover that can be placed over the camera’s viewfinder to prevent light from entering when using the monitor to compose photos instead.

Nikon D750 Viewfinder Cover

Nikon D750 Viewfinder Cover

Battery & Charger

The battery itself is fairly nondescript. It’s average size for a camera battery and has “Nikon Lithium Ion Battery Pack molded into the top. The battery has an arrow on it to indicate which end goes into the camera first, and it has both a curved and flat side to it so that it can only fit in the camera in one direction.

Nikon EN-EL15 Battery

Nikon EN-EL15 Battery

The power connector has 5 prongs to it which are protected by plastic fins. On the bottom of the battery is all of the certification labels and technical details. The battery supplied with the Nikon D750 is a Nikon model EN-EL15 battery, 7.0V, 1900mAh, and 14 Wh.

Nikon EN-EL15 Battery

Nikon EN-EL15 Battery

The battery charger itself is a bit interesting. It’s rectangular in shape with rounded edges and a slot for the battery to be inserted. What’s odd is that the wall connector was actually supplied loose and needs to be plugged into the charger by the consumer. I’m guessing this lets Nikon minimize the number of different chargers they need to manufacture. They can simply produce the same charger for use anywhere in the world and supply a different wall plug accordingly.

Nikon D750 Battery Charger

Nikon D750 Battery Charger

I decided to start charging the battery. The battery snapped right into place and when plugged into the wall, there’s an orange light that flashes to indicate charging is underway. A quick check in the manual told me to expect charging to take about 2.5 hours and the orange light would be solid when ready.

Conclusion

Unboxing the Nikon D750 was a lot of fun! Nikon definitely went minimalistic on the packaging design, but it was clean, well thought-out, and components were easy to remove.

Do you own a Nikon camera? What do you think of their packaging? What was your unboxing experience like? Let me know in the comments!

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